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Recovery Help

If you or someone you love needs recovery help from drugs or alcohol, please take a moment to speak with a recovery support specialist at: 800-980-3927

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Learn About Treatment Types

The path to addiction treatment isn't a straight line, and the process is as individual as the people we're helping. The following topics cover the most common areas of substance abuse rehabilitation and give you a brief overview of what to expect. Don't let the name fool you, Recoveryy.org can help with the entire range of drug and alcohol treatment phases, not just Rehabs! If you're ready to take the next step and get help for yourself or a family member, call an advisor today. Don't waste another day you could spend getting well.

Getting Sober

So you're looking to get help, either for yourself or someone you love. This is the first major step toward a sober, drug-free life!

Intervention Services

When your loved one or friend doesn't recognize the damage they are doing to themselves or people around them, a difficult but necessary discussion must be had.

Alcohol and Drug Detox

Detoxification is the process whereby the body is carefully weaned off the addictive substances in a measured fashion while any withdrawal symptoms are treated.

Rehab Treatment

A patient continues their stay in a residential facility or outpatient program for physical and mental recovery, during and after the completion of a detox regimen.

Addiction Therapy

Key components to any course of inpatient or outpatient treatment are group and individual addiction therapy. They help the patient to overcome root issues and build healthy coping skills.

Extended Care

Aftercare helps create a strong support network, which is a vital part of staying sober and drug-free. It often begins in a group therapy setting.

Sober Living

Sober living communities are for patients who want the ongoing support and camaraderie of others adjusting to a new, clean life.

Recovery Programs

A person's commitment to long-term wellness requires attentiveness and support, and it will create physical and mental health benefits for the rest of their lives.

Relapse Prevention

Making sure you're in tune with your body and mind and knowing how to keep yourself from relapsing during stressful times will be the key to keeping yourself free from addiction.

Begin the healing process today!

Speak to one of our recovery advisors and receive a free confidential consultation.

CLICK to CALL 800-980-3927

People experiencing or engaging in drug abuse, alcohol dependency or prescription medication addiction need all the recovery help they can get. Fortunately, many tools and resources are available to help someone begin recovery and maintain a substance abuse free lifestyle.

A Recovery Support Specialist can provide you with many options; including inpatient rehab programs, outpatient treatment centers and support groups.

Learn more today by calling a Recovery Help Consultant at: 800-980-3927

Drug Addiction

Many people do not understand why people become addicted to drugs or how drugs change the brain to foster compulsive drug abuse. They mistakenly view drug abuse and addiction as strictly a social problem and may characterize those who take drugs as morally weak. One very common belief is that drug abusers should be able to just stop taking drugs if they are only willing to change their behavior.

What people often underestimate is the complexity of drug addiction - that it is a disease that impacts the brain, and because of that, stopping drug abuse is not simply a matter of willpower. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and resume productive lives.

What Is Drug Addiction?

Drug addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences to the drug addict and those around them. Drug addiction is a brain disease because the abuse of drugs leads to changes in the structure and function of the brain. Although it is true that for most people the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary, over time the changes in the brain caused by repeated drug abuse can affect a person's self-control and ability to make sound decisions, and at the same time create an intense impulse to take drugs.

It is because of these changes in the brain that it is so challenging for a person who is addicted to stop abusing drugs. Fortunately, there are treatments that help people to counteract addiction's powerful disruptive effects and regain control. Research shows that combining addiction treatment medications, if available, with behavioral therapy is the best way to ensure success for most patients. Treatment approaches that are tailored to each patient's drug abuse patterns and any concurrent medical, psychiatric, and social problems can lead to sustained recovery and a life without drugs.

As with other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, asthma or heart disease, drug addiction can be managed effectively. Yet, it is not uncommon for a person to relapse and begin abusing drugs again. Relapse does not signal failure; rather, it indicates that treatment should be reinstated or adjusted, or that alternate treatment is needed to help the person regain control and recover.

If you or someone you love is struggling with a drug addiction problem, please speak with a recovery consultant today at: 800-980-3927

What Happens to Your Brain When You Take Drugs?

Drugs are chemicals that tap into the brain's communication system and disrupt the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. There are at least two ways that drugs are able to do this: by imitating the brain's natural chemical messengers, and/or overstimulating the "reward circuit" of the brain.

Some drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, have a similar structure to chemical messengers, called neurotransmitters, which are naturally produced by the brain. Because of this similarity, these drugs are able to "fool" the brain's receptors and activate nerve cells to send abnormal messages.

Other drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine (crystal meth & adderall), can cause the nerve cells to release abnormally large amounts of natural neurotransmitters, or prevent the normal recycling of these brain chemicals, which is needed to shut off the signal between neurons. This disruption produces a greatly amplified message that ultimately disrupts normal communication patterns.

Nearly all drugs, directly or indirectly, target the brain's reward system by flooding the circuit with dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter present in regions of the brain that control movement, emotion, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. The over-stimulation of this system, which normally responds to natural behaviors that are linked to survival (eating, spending time with loved ones, etc), produces euphoric effects in response to the drugs. This reaction sets in motion a pattern that "teaches" people to repeat the behavior of abusing drugs.

As a person continues to abuse drugs, the brain adapts to the dopamine surges by producing less dopamine or reducing dopamine receptors. The user must therefore keep abusing drugs to bring his or her dopamine function back to ''normal'' or use more drugs to achieve a dopamine high.

Long-term drug abuse causes changes in other brain chemical systems and circuits, as well. Brain imaging studies of drug-addicted individuals show changes in areas of the brain that are critical to judgment, decision-making, learning and memory, and behavior control. Together, these changes can drive an abuser to seek out and take drugs compulsively -- in other words, to become addicted to drugs.

A recovery help advisor can answer your questions 24 hours a day and provide you with real solutions. 800-980-3927

Why Do Some People Become Addicted While Others Do Not?

No single factor can predict whether or not a person will become addicted to drugs. Risk for addiction is influenced by a person's biology, social environment, and age or stage of development. The more risk factors an individual has, the greater the chance that taking drugs can lead to addiction. For example:

Biology. The genes that people are born with - in combination with environmental influences - account for about half of their addiction vulnerability. Additionally, gender, ethnicity, and the presence of other mental disorders may influence risk for drug abuse and addiction.

Environment. A person's environment includes many different influences -- from family and friends to socioeconomic status and quality of life, in general. Factors such as peer pressure, physical and sexual abuse, stress, and parental involvement can greatly influence the course of drug abuse and addiction in a person's life.

Development. Genetic and environmental factors interact with critical developmental stages in a person's life to affect addiction vulnerability, and adolescents experience a double challenge. Although taking drugs at any age can lead to addiction, the earlier that drug use begins, the more likely it is to progress to more serious abuse. And because adolescents' brains are still developing in the areas that govern decision making, judgment, and self-control, they are especially prone to risk-taking behaviors, including trying drugs of abuse.

Prevention Is Key

Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Research has shown that prevention programs that involve the family, schools, communities, and the media are effective in reducing drug abuse. Although many events and cultural factors affect drug abuse trends, when youths perceive drug abuse as harmful, they reduce their drug taking. It is necessary, therefore, to help youth and the general public to understand the risks of drug abuse and for teachers, parents, and health care professionals to keep sending the message that drug addiction can be prevented if a person never abuses drugs.

Find out more about recovery help, treatment and prevention by speaking with an alcohol and drug addiction recovery specialist at: 800-980-3927

Alcohol Addiction, Abuse And Dependency

Treating alcoholism usually involves a combination of treatments. A person may be involved in group therapy, counseling, and medication. The person will probably follow a standard 12-step program to overcome alcoholism. It is a process that takes time because it not only deals with the alcohol but also underlying issues that make the person want to drink. Detoxification may be necessary if the person is addicted. If this happens, withdrawal is a normal part of the process.

If you are concerned about your own or another person's alcohol or drug use, learn what steps to take to help yourself or someone else. It starts by not ignoring the problem.

Ask the person if he or she will accept help. Don't give up after the first “no"— contact a recovery help specialist and ask to speak with a drug and alcohol intervention expert at: 800-980-3927

If he or she agrees, act that very day to arrange for help. Call a recovery help

consultant immediately to discuss what the appropriate level care is based on

medically necessity (hospital based detox program, inpatient alcohol rehab center,

outpatient alcohol treatment program etc).

Some alcohol and drug abuse problems can be prevented.

Do not drink alcohol or use drugs if you are pregnant. Drinking or using drugs before trying to become pregnant and during pregnancy increases your baby's chances of being born with birth defects and fetal alcohol syndrome..

Talk to your children about the effects of alcohol and drugs. Children are less likely to use alcohol or other drugs if their parents teach them early (during the elementary school years) about the effects of alcohol and drugs.

Set a good example for your children by not abusing alcohol or using drugs.

Encourage your teenager to avoid alcohol and drugs. Drinking alcohol or using drugs during the teen years can harm growth and development. It can also cause some teens to develop substance abuse problems later in life. Drug use in this age group increases the chance that your teen will be involved in crime, high-risk sexual behavior, accidents, and injuries.

Provide nonalcoholic beverages at parties and meals. Don't give your children the impression that you have to have alcohol to have a good time as an adult.

Cut down on your drinking. Safe levels are: less than 2 drinks a day for men and 1 drink a day for women. One drink is 12 fl oz (360 mL) of beer, 5 fl oz (150 mL) of wine, or 1.5 fl oz (45 mL) of hard liquor. Do not drink every day. See the topic

Look for signs of mental stress. Try to understand and resolve sources of depression, anxiety or loneliness. Don't use alcohol or drugs to deal with these problems.

Ask your pharmacist or doctor whether any of your current medicines can cause dependence.

Be especially aware of pain medicines, tranquilizers, sedatives, and sleeping pills. Follow the instructions carefully, and do not take more than the recommended dose.

Make sure that your doctors are aware of medicines prescribed by another doctor. Use only one pharmacy when getting your prescriptions filled.

Do not regularly use medicines to sleep, lose weight, or relax. Seek non drug solutions.

Do not suddenly stop taking any medicine without your doctor's supervision.

Do not drink alcohol when you are taking medicines. Alcohol can react with many medicines and cause serious complications.

Do not smoke or use other tobacco products. Many people relate tobacco use to alcohol and drug use.

Contact a recovery help consultant today to learn more or begin healing from a drug addiction, alcohol dependency or substance abuse problem. 800-980-3927

Stress and Prescription Drug Addiction

Understanding the deep connections between stress and drug addiction is essential to drug abuse recovery. People who experienced stress, such as child abuse, early in life are more likely to become addicted to drugs. Stressful mental health conditions like depression and anxiety also increase the risk for opioid addiction. People with a prescription drug addiction often say stress was a reason they began abusing pain pills.

Making the situation worse, opioid addiction itself causes lasting changes in the parts of the brain that deal with stress. People with opioid addiction have a persistent overactive response to stress, even years after completing detox.

Stress is a major stimulus for drug craving, according to people with opioid addiction. Not surprisingly, life stress is one of the main reasons people give for relapsing into prescription drug abuse. For all these reasons, learning methods to better cope with stress are an essential part of drug abuse recovery.

Family, Friends, and Addiction Recovery

One of the primary causes of relapse in pain pill addiction is an inability to develop intimate relationships. No one recovers from prescription drug addiction alone.

Rebuilding close connections with family and friends is essential to successful drug abuse recovery. This often requires the addicted person to recognize and make amends for the damage caused by past behavior.

At the same time, the addicted person's family will be going through its own recovery process. Re-establishing trust and mutual respect can take months or even years. Nothing can replace the healing properties of time spent together with loved ones.

A Recovery Help Advisor is available 24 hours a day: 800-980-3927

Maintaining Hope and Health During Drug Abuse Recovery

Addiction recovery help support groups are oftentimes a critical component to a person's immediate and long term progress. Experts believe group therapy is superior to individual therapy for people recovering from prescription drug abuse. The group setting allows peers to both support and challenge each other, and creates a sense of shared community.

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) https://www.na.org is an international network of community-based meetings for those recovering from drug addiction. Modeled after Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) http://www.aa.org, NA is an abstinence-based 12-step program with a defined process for overcoming addiction. More than 58,000 NA meetings take place every week worldwide.

Methadone Anonymous is a similar 12-step program that acknowledges the value of maintenance therapy with methadone or Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) for recovery.

Family members often have their own emotional problems that come from coping with their loved one's addiction. They can often benefit from attending their own support group, sharing their stories and experiences with other families. Nar-Anon, an offshoot of Narcotics Anonymous, is the most well-known.

A Recovery Help Assistant can provide you with many resources for your new life in recovery: 800-980-3927

Exercise and Addiction Recovery

Drug addiction takes a toll on the body, along with the mind and soul. Exercise hasn't been studied for drug abuse recovery. However, exercise releases natural endorphins, feel-good chemicals that relax the brain and body and reduce stress.

Besides improving overall health, exercise improves mood and builds self-esteem, key areas in drug abuse recovery. Thirty minutes of daily physical activity, like brisk walking, will bring overall health benefits. Exercising with a group will also enhance interpersonal relationships and help develop connections outside the world of addiction.

Meditation During Addiction Recovery

The central principle of all forms of meditation is to focus attention on the present moment, the "now." Some experts believe addictions result in part from an attempt to escape psychological pain. Meditation can help an addict face painful feelings and understand how these feelings contribute to craving. This can potentially help the person discover healthy ways of coping with bad feelings, without using drugs.

Spirituality, Service, and Addiction Treatment

Many people in drug abuse recovery say their spirituality is important in staying clean and sober. Attending religious services, regular community service, and daily prayer are examples of activities that have helped many who believe a higher power is essential to their continued recovery.

Treatment for addiction is just a call away. A Recovery Help Consultant can help you get started. Learn more today by calling: 800-980-3927

Recovery Help Insurance Provider Benefits

Allow one of our recovery help specialists maximize your available drug and alcohol rehab insurance benefits and pre qualify you or your loved one. With some insurance plans, there may be no out-of-pocket treatment costs. An intake specialist can also quote private substance abuse and or mental health treatment pay options. We work with a vast network of treatment centers around the country to ensure a wide range of options.

Aetna Health Insurance

Aetna Health Insurance – Serving over 36 million people nationwide, Aetna Health Insurance allows you and your loved ones to utilize in-network benefits for the cost of drug rehab treatment.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association – Also known as BCBS, Blue Cross Blue Shield healthcare allows you to utilize your out-of-network benefits for treatment.

UnitedHealth Group Insurance

UnitedHealth Group Insurance – Many treatment providers are contracted with United Behavioral Health. Utilize your in-network benefits for an addiction treatment program that is unique to your specific needs.

Cigna Health Insurance

Cigna Health Insurance – Cigna Health Care is recognized globally for its customer care and insurance coverage. You can utilize your out-of-network benefits to help cover the cost of drug rehab treatment.

Humana Health Insurance

Humana Health Insurance – Humana provides many forms of insurance coverage and allows you to utilize in-network benefits to cover an addiction treatment program.

Value Options Behavioral Health Care

Value Options Behavioral Health Care – Value Options is the largest independent behavioral healthcare company in the nation. Many drug and alcohol rehabs will readily accept Value Options’ in-network benefits.


AmeriHealth – Offering nationwide coverage, AmeriHealth insurance is also readily accepted by many drug and alcohol treatment centers for you to utilize your out-of-network benefits. In many cases your insurance can cover most, if not all, of your treatment costs.


ComPsych – ComPsych insurance specializes in behavioral health, the branch that includes alcohol and drug addiction treatment. ComPsych’s in-network benefits may cover the cost for treatment.

GEHA Health Plans

GEHA Health Plans – Providing insurance for federal workers, GEHA Health Plans allow you to use your out-of-network benefits for alcohol and drug addiction treatment.

APS Healthcare

APS Healthcare – APS Healthcare provides multiple plans including behavioral health. APS Healthcare’s out-of-network benefits may cover your drug rehab treatment.

Medical Mutual

Medical Mutual of Ohio”s out of network benefits may help cover the cost of addiction treatment.

Great West Insurance

Great West Insurance – Great West Insurance has provided benefits for quality addiction treatment for over 50 years. Many treatment programs have a relationship with Great West and accept their in-network benefits.

PLEASE NOTE: If your Insurance Company was not included, please call us and speak with one of our recovery help specialists to find out what your specific provider benefits cover: 800-980-3927

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